fbpx

Melkio’s artwork revolves around his drawing. Theatre, poetry, storytelling, and photography, tackled alone or with other artists, are always consistent expressions in the overall framework of his production.

Still, his graphic production is perhaps the most intimate and immediate way to observe the intentions and ideas underlying his creativity.

He uses the digital drawing technique but with an almost analogical manipulation of the graphics tablet. The lines are never cleaned up, so the images continue to look distinctively like the hand-drawn sketches that engendered them. During the creation phase, the graphic part of the work on the tablet allows Melkio to consider and refine the project while preserving, as mentioned, its original spontaneity in the stroke.

His work can be broken down into two large-scale areas:

On the one hand, large drawings where both colour and images and details saturate the composition.

His signature style is sharper and more defined, and the application of colour is also designed to emphasise the shape as a whole. The need for graphic representation is in these cases intended to produce highly surrealistic and hyper-unrealistic imagery.

As such, Melkio depicts dreamlike visions, wordplay, associations of ideas, but he portrays them with extreme clarity in style, as if he were rendering clear images of a nameless reality.

His works are an invitation to play and to share. Melkio encourages us to follow him inside his drawings, to focus our attention on every detail, like we did when we were children looking at pictures; he asks us to smile with him and not to be ashamed of that goofy, dazed smile that separates us from the here and now.

This production is accompanied by what he calls the “SEEDS”.

These are real sketches, drawings formed of essential elements that serve the same purpose as a camera flash. Melkio shoots a speeding flash of light on off-the-cuff ideas and thoughts to capture in a drawing.

Melkio uses these images to very effectively engage with the narrative rhythm, albeit playing by stepping way back from his style. Melkio continues to interact with the onlooker in this series, but he sets up a different communication. His drawings are purely evocative, like a pin that catches our attention and then leaves us in the free field of the association of ideas.

A small workout in images that Melkio gives the all too often atrophied muscle of our imagination.